Course description

This course is only offered in the Summer Session.

What does it mean to be a “good” reader or a “good” writer in college? In each section of this course, students receive extensive guidance from their instructors in the discovery and practice of helpful methods for fully exploring and appreciating what they read as well as guidance in planning, drafting, and writing essays about what is read and discussed in class. Each section of the course focuses on a particular topic drawn from a range of fields (e.g., literature, history, film, music). Reading assignments are limited in order to allow ample time for discussion and for personal attention to student writing.

In general, Cornell students are required to take two semesters of First-Year Writing Seminars. Also see your college requirements.

No upcoming classes were found.

Previously offered classes

Summer 2022: Ithaca campus

Derek Adams
Derek Adams
Assistant Professor, Department of English
Section ID:ENGL 1131 101-SEM
Number:1285
Topic:Pre-Collegiate Writing Seminar: The Language of Hatred in a Postracial World
Program:Pre-Collegiate Summer Scholars Program
Session:Summer 6-week
Class dates:June 21-July 29, 2022
Final exam/project due:Friday July 29, 8:30 AM - 9:45 AM / Goldwin Smith Hall 348 (see Final exams)
Time / room:M-F 8:30 AM - 9:45 AM / Goldwin Smith Hall 348
Mode of instruction:In person
Credit:3
Grade:Graded
Instructor:Adams, D. (da493)
Max. enroll:17
Restrictions:Intended for students participating in the Pre-Collegiate Summer Scholars Program
Notes:

The Language of Hatred in a Postracial World -- This literature course offers a direct challenge to the popular public sentiment that we live in a post-racial society and that structures of power and privilege have ceased to exist in our world. In this class, we will explore the persistent operation of systematic discrimination in the 20th and 21st centuries through a collection of novels and short stories. We will also sharpen our analytical skills by examining magazine covers, advertisements, critical essays, and websites. Our study begins from the position that certain code words and social practices have transformed overt types of discrimination into more subtle and deceiving forms of bigotry. Deplorable racist, sexist, and homophobic terms may have fallen out of fashion, but their essence lives on in our daily speech, public policies, and group interactions. We will devote a significant amount of time to assessing how an author depicts social interactions influenced by this coded language, as well as account for the ways that the term ?postracial? functions as a censor to dissuade us from critiquing it. Written assignments for the course will be analytical, self-reflective, and academic.

To enroll:See Pre-Collegiate Summer Scholars Program for enrollment information.

Summer 2022: Ithaca campus

Section ID:ENGL 1131 102-SEM
Number:1286
Topic:Pre-Collegiate Writing Seminar: Memoir and Memory
Program:Pre-Collegiate Summer Scholars Program
Session:Summer 6-week
Class dates:June 21-July 29, 2022
Final exam/project due:Friday July 29, 10 AM - 11:15 AM / Uris Hall G28 (see Final exams)
Time / room:M-F 10 AM - 11:15 AM / Uris Hall G28
Mode of instruction:In person
Credit:3
Grade:Graded
Instructor:Jefferis, S. (sbj3)
Max. enroll:17
Restrictions:Intended for students participating in the Pre-Collegiate Summer Scholars Program
Notes:

Memoir and Memory -- We will examine poems, memoirs, essays, short stories, photographs and installation art, and video in order to ask the question: from what perch does this writer view his/her story, what narratives are they telling/constructing and in what form, how is story being constructed, retold, and imagined, how is personal and communal memory recalled and formed, rewritten and forgotten, and what ontological questions are present. We will always ask questions about POV and positionality, as we seek to understand the complicated status of being both privileged and/or oppressed. Each of the texts will lead to questions and discoveries for your own essay topics. We will dedicate abundant class time to the exploration of your responses to the reading through both writing and class discussion. You will be required to write informal reading responses, four formal essays, critical thinking questions, responses to your own and classmates? work, and to lead a class discussion. By the end of the course, you will learn to develop communicative written responses with conviction.

To enroll:See Pre-Collegiate Summer Scholars Program for enrollment information.

Summer 2022: Ithaca campus

Derek Adams
Derek Adams
Assistant Professor, Department of English
Section ID:ENGL 1131 103-SEM
Number:1287
Topic:Pre-Collegiate Writing Seminar: The Language of Hatred in a Postracial World
Program:Pre-Collegiate Summer Scholars Program
Session:Summer 6-week
Class dates:June 21-July 29, 2022
Final exam/project due:Friday July 29, 10 AM - 11:15 AM / Goldwin Smith Hall 348 (see Final exams)
Time / room:M-F 10 AM - 11:15 AM / Goldwin Smith Hall 348
Mode of instruction:In person
Credit:3
Grade:Graded
Instructor:Adams, D. (da493)
Max. enroll:17
Restrictions:Intended for students participating in the Pre-Collegiate Summer Scholars Program
Notes:

The Language of Hatred in a Postracial World -- This literature course offers a direct challenge to the popular public sentiment that we live in a post-racial society and that structures of power and privilege have ceased to exist in our world. In this class, we will explore the persistent operation of systematic discrimination in the 20th and 21st centuries through a collection of novels and short stories. We will also sharpen our analytical skills by examining magazine covers, advertisements, critical essays, and websites. Our study begins from the position that certain code words and social practices have transformed overt types of discrimination into more subtle and deceiving forms of bigotry. Deplorable racist, sexist, and homophobic terms may have fallen out of fashion, but their essence lives on in our daily speech, public policies, and group interactions. We will devote a significant amount of time to assessing how an author depicts social interactions influenced by this coded language, as well as account for the ways that the term ?postracial? functions as a censor to dissuade us from critiquing it. Written assignments for the course will be analytical, self-reflective, and academic.

To enroll:See Pre-Collegiate Summer Scholars Program for enrollment information.

Summer 2022: Ithaca campus

Section ID:ENGL 1131 104-SEM
Number:1290
Topic:Metaphor in Art/Sci/Cult
Session:Summer 6-week
Class dates:June 21-July 29, 2022
Final exam/project due:Tuesday August 02, 8:30 AM - 11 AM / White Hall 114 (see Final exams)
Time / room:M-F 10 AM - 11:15 AM / White Hall 114
Mode of instruction:In person
Credit:3
Grade:Graded
Instructor:Zukovic, B. (bbz4)
Max. enroll:17
Notes:

Metaphor in Art/Sci/Cult -- Metaphor is the essence of human creativity? A form of thought, desire and the language of the unconscious mind. How does metaphor operate in literature, pop culture, politics, and the thought of theoretical scientists such as Einstein and Richard Feynman? Can we improve our capacity to think metaphorically?

To enroll:Enrollment for this class is closed.

This course is open to all registrants, including undergraduates and precollege students.

Summer 2022: Online course

Section ID:ENGL 1131 105-SEM
Number:1614
Topic:How We Got Here: Challenges of Our Modern World
Session:Summer 6-week
Class dates:June 21-July 29, 2022
Final exam/project due:Friday July 29, 1 PM - 2:15 PM / Online (see Final exams)
Time / room:M-F 1 PM - 2:15 PM / Online
Mode of instruction:Online learning
Credit:3
Grade:Graded
Instructor:King, T.
Regenspan, B. (blr98)
Shapiro, E.
Tuckey, M.
Max. enroll:17
Notes:

The question so many of us are asking as we recognize the non-sustainability of our current world, given the social polarizations around race, distribution of wealth, our personal relationships, and the climate is, "How did we get here?"  This is a class intended for students who are curious about how developments in (mostly) western thinking during the era sometimes called “late modernity” (1830-1945)--through to the "postmodern" present--affect the way we act and think as individuals and groups—including ideas about love, community, nature, race, power, the human spirit and social justice.  (Related, why the current passion for banning certain books and ideas?)  Further, can we shift our thinking to save ourselves and enjoy our lives?  This course will help you develop the skills of competent college readers and writers by embracing the process of writing and revision while considering ideas of Ghandi, Marx, DuBois, Freud, and others, including their feminist allies and critics, as they are expressed in selections from their original writing and/or in selections from contemporary film, narrative, and poetry, both documentary and imaginative. 

To enroll:Enrollment for this class is closed.

See Online Learning FAQs.

This course is open to all registrants, including undergraduates and precollege students.