Course description

This course is only offered in the Summer Session.

What does it mean to be a “good” reader or a “good” writer in college? In each section of this course, students receive extensive guidance from their instructors in the discovery and practice of helpful methods for fully exploring and appreciating what they read as well as guidance in planning, drafting, and writing essays about what is read and discussed in class. Each section of the course focuses on a particular topic drawn from a range of fields (e.g., literature, history, film, music). Reading assignments are limited in order to allow ample time for discussion and for personal attention to student writing.

In general, Cornell students are required to take two semesters of First-Year Writing Seminars. Also see your college requirements.

Classes

No upcoming classes were found.

Previously offered classes

The ENGL 1131 101-SEM section of this course has been canceled.

Summer 2020: Online course

Section ID:ENGL 1131 102-SEM
Number:1128
Topic:Prefreshman Writing Seminar: Memoir and Memory
Class dates:June 22-August 4, 2020
Due date:TBA (see Final exams)
Time / room:M-F 11:30 AM - 12:45 PM / Other, Off-Campus
Mode of instruction:Synchronous distance learning
Credit:3
Grade:Graded
Instructor:Jefferis, S. (sbj3)
Max. enroll:17
Restrictions:Intended for students participating in the Prefreshman Summer Program
  This is an online course. Please review the online course FAQs.
To enroll:Enrollment for this class is closed.

Summer 2020: Online course

Section ID:ENGL 1131 103-SEM
Number:1129
Topic:Challenges of Modernity
Class dates:June 22-August 4, 2020
Due date:Friday July 31, 11:59 PM (see Final exams)
Time / room:M-F 10 AM - 11:15 AM / Other, Off-Campus
Mode of instruction:Synchronous distance learning
Credit:3
Grade:Graded
Instructor:Regenspan, B. (blr98)
Max. enroll:17
  This is an online course. Please review the online course FAQs.

Challenges of Modernity -- How did developments in thinking - including ideas about love, community, race, and power - during the historical era sometimes called "late modernity" (1830's-1945)--affect the way we think and act in the present? We'll study and write about some "late modern" ideas, and also examine a wild range of contemporary global thinkers and creators (including ourselves!) to speculate on how we arrived at the current socially and environmentally non-sustainable moment, and how we might emerge from it! This course should help prepare you to be a competent college reader and writer, while engaging you in the thinking of Kant, Darwin, Marx, Freud, DuBois, Carter Woodson among others, (and their feminist critics) often through the lens of contemporary queer philosopher Deborah Britzman's contention that "the confusion of education and love begins at birth."

To enroll:Enrollment for this class is closed.

The ENGL 1131 104-SEM section of this course has been canceled.

The ENGL 1131 105-SEM section of this course has been canceled.