Course description

This course will survey a number of famous paradoxes about the nature of time, identity, logic, science, belief, decision, and value. Some of these paradoxes have widely accepted answers, but many do not. Paradoxes include (but are not limited to) Zeno’s paradoxes, the sorites paradox, the liar paradox, paradoxes of probability, the doomsday and simulation arguments, Newcomb’s puzzle, and the trolley problem. These paradoxes will be used as a stepping stone to deeper philosophical questions. Some of the questions we’ll tackle include: Is time real? What is a person? Is infinity coherent? How is science possible? What is knowledge? What is it to be rational? What should we do? Does God exist? And finally, why is death bad?

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Previously offered classes

Summer 2022: Ithaca campus

Section ID:PHIL 2300 001-LEC
Number:1673
Session:Summer 6-week
Class dates:June 21-July 29, 2022
Final exam/project due:Tuesday August 02, 6 PM - 8:30 PM / Goldwin Smith Hall 283 (see Final exams)
Time / room:M-F 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM / Goldwin Smith Hall 283
Mode of instruction:In person
Credit:4
Grade:Student option
Instructor:Walsh, J. (jw2682)
Max. enroll:20
To enroll:Enrollment for this class is closed.

This course is open to all registrants, including undergraduates and precollege students.